Being injured in a car accident in Georgia can be a frightening experience. It can also be a costly one. If you’re injured in an accident, there’s a good chance your injuries will require costly medical treatment. What’s worse, you may not be prepared to pay for it.

Fortunately, you may not have to bear ultimate responsibility for your medical expenses. Another party’s insurance may be required to pay them.

Medical Bills and Insurance

Car accidents occur for many reasons. Often, they happen because a driver is negligent

Examples of negligent driving include the following:

  • Drunk driving
  • Speeding
  • Failing to yield the right-of-way
  • Distracted driving, which is becoming increasingly common in the age of smartphones
  • Drowsy driving
  • Aggressive driving

Georgia is an at-fault state for auto insurance. In at-fault states, car accident victims can file claims or lawsuits against an at-fault driver to recover compensation for their losses after a wreck. They typically file their claim against the insurer for the at-fault party to obtain reimbursement for medical bills and other losses, such as lost wages.

What To Do After a Car Accident in Georgia

Filing a claim doesn’t guarantee a payout. You need to provide evidence showing that another party was negligent to recover compensation. An insurer will likely undervalue or deny your claim if you cannot provide sufficient evidence.

That’s why it’s important to know what steps you must take in the immediate aftermath of a car accident. They include:

  • Checking yourself and your passengers for injuries
  • Moving to a safe spot far from traffic
  • Calmly checking on the other drivers involved in the accident
  • Exchanging contact and insurance information
  • Calling the police to report the accident
  • Avoiding making any statements that might be interpreted as admissions of fault
  • Taking pictures of the scene and your injuries
  • Getting the names and contact information of any witnesses
  • Seeing a doctor right away

You should see a doctor even if you aren’t showing signs of injury. Signs and symptoms of an injury may not develop until days or weeks later. The earlier you receive treatment, the easier your recovery is likely to be.

Moreover, if you don’t seek prompt medical attention, an insurer could accuse you of failing to mitigate your damages. They may deny or reduce the value of your claim.

You should also strongly consider reviewing your case with an attorney. An attorney can help in the following ways:

  • Conducting an investigation
  • Gathering evidence to prove negligence
  • Filing a claim
  • Handling all correspondence with the insurance company
  • Negotiating for fair compensation

The negligent parties who cause car accidents are usually other drivers. However, there are exceptions.

Other Parties May Cause Car Accidents

A car accident may happen when a vehicle’s manufacturer failed to identify and address a hazardous defect. In this case, you could pursue compensation by filing a claim against the manufacturer of the vehicle or a vehicle part.

Government agencies are responsible for maintaining safe roadways. Sometimes accidents occur because they don’t address hazards in a timely manner. For example, suppose you were in an accident because a government agency failed to repair or replace a broken traffic signal. In this scenario, you may be able to hold the government agency responsible for your medical bills and other losses.

Your attorney will identify all parties who contributed to your accident. This process will ensure you receive maximum compensation for your damages.